Friday, April 20, 2018

Crafting a Great Hero - Part 2 Captain Blood

by Elva Cobb Martin


Click here if you missed Part 1 - Atticus Finch
 http://bit.ly/2HFDkD3

In the 1935 movie, actor Errol Flynn played Captain Blood and it launched Flynn's career. The book was written by Rafael Sabatini.

Here's the brief story line if you've never read the book or seen the Turner Classic Movie: 

Arrested during the Monmouth Rebellion and falsely convicted of treason when he treated a wounded follower of Monmouth, Irishman Dr. Peter Blood is banished to the West Indies and sold into slavery. In Port Royal, Jamaica the Governor's daughter Arabella Bishop (Olivia de Havilland) buys him for £10 to spite her uncle, Col. Bishop who owns a major plantation. Life is hard for the men and for Blood as well. By chance he treats the Governor's gout and is soon part of the medical service. He dreams of freedom and when the opportunity strikes, he and his friends rebel taking over a Spanish ship that has attacked the city. Soon, they are the most feared pirates on the seas, men without a country, attacking all ships. When Arabella is prisoner, Blood decides to return her to Port Royal only to find that it is under the control of England's new enemy, France. All of them must decide if they are to fight for their new King. The surprise ending is great.

The story and this character continue to inspire and entertain new generations over the world.

What makes the character Peter Blood so unforgettable?


1) He is courageous

Who, but one with great courage, can escape slavery in the late 1600's in the Caribbean and lead a crew of slaves with him, then capture a Spanish ship and become its new captain and a feared pirate?

2) He is compassionate

Peter Blood first got arrested in England for treating an injured follower of Monmouth who was rebelling against the king. Many other times his compassion is shown toward his fellow man, including the Governor of Jamaica, whom he treats for painful gout.

3) He is a composite --the very essence of the swashbuckling trickster hero every generation loves.

This type hero reaches back to Samson and other Bible heroes.

Fictional prototypes are Ivanhoe, Zorro, The Scarlet Pimpernel and the contemporary Superman, Bat Man and others.

The swashbuckling trickster hero is able to defy social expectations and rise above social class. He has a keen wit that stands him in good stead in crises. He is a master of disguise and deception when necessary. He is able to baffle his enemies and defeat his opponents. By his wits and fortitude he's able to overcome terrible adversity and establish himself as a noble leader of men. He demonstrates that nobility is innate. It is achieved by chivalrous behavior, not by aristocratic birth.

Peter Blood's personal journey from slave to governor of Jamaica inspires the dreams of men and women on every continent to aspire beyond their present circumstances.


I crafted my In a Pirate's Debt hero after the swashbuckling prototype. Captain Lucas "Bloodstone" Barrett faces many forces of evil with courage before he finds a happy life within the law and with the plucky heroine. Here's the link to this novel http://amzn.to/2i61Z5P

Thanks for stopping by. Who is your fave fictional hero and why? Would love to  read your comments. And please do share this blog by clicking on the small icons below.

Blessings,
Elva


Elva Cobb Martin is vice-president of the South Carolina Chapter of American Christian Fiction Writers. She is a former school teacher and a graduate of Anderson University and Erskine College. She has two inspirational novels published with Lighthouse Publishers of the Carolinas. Summer of Deception, a contemporary romantic suspense, and an historical romance, In a Pirate’s Debt. Both have spent time on Amazon’s 100 Best Sellers List for Women’s Religious Fiction. Decision, Charisma, and Home Life have carried Elva's articles. Jim Hart of Hartline Literary represents her. She and her husband Dwayne are semi-retired ministers. A mother and grandmother, Elva lives in South Carolina. Connect with her on her web site http://www.elvamartin.com,on Twitter www.twitter.com/ElvaCobbMartin; Facebook http://www.facebook.com/elvacobbmartin;  and Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/elvacobbmartin

 Link to her romance novels and non-fiction works on Amazon:http://amzn.to/2pOgVHI



Friday, April 13, 2018

Crafting a Great Hero - Part 1 Atticus Finch

by Elva Cobb Martin


Who doesn't like a great hero?

Atticus Finch of To Kill a Mockingbird fame is one hero I love. I don't know whether my fascination is more with the character Harper Lee created or  for the actor who played his part in the movie, Gregory Peck. Who doesn't know and love Gregory Peck? Okay, spoken like a grandmother.

For those, hopefully few, of you who are unfamiliar with this great novel, it is the story of a small town lawyer (Atticus) who defends a black man accused of rape of a white woman back in Depression days long before the civil rights movement. The setting is a 1930's southern town but the book was published in 1960 and won the Pulitzer Prize. It has become a classic of American literature.
One reviewer says "To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely-read book dealing with racism in America and its protagonist, Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism. Atticus serves as moral hero and a model of integrity for lawyers everywhere."


Let's take a look at hero Atticus, and I give credit to a blog by Brett and Kate McKay who also see great manly lessons in this character. What can we learn from this character to help us  construct an unforgettable hero for our novels?


1) A real hero lives with integrity every day.

In Maycomb County, Atticus was known as a man who was "the same in his house as he is on the public streets." He did not have one set of morals for business and one for family or one for different days of the week. He tells his young daughter, Scout, "The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience."


2) The most important form of courage is moral courage.

Atticus certainly possessed physical courage. When Tom was in jail, he sat outside all night reading and faced down an angry mob intent on lynching the prisoner. And he also faced down and shot a rabid dog threatening the town.

But his moral courage was amazing. When Scout asked him why he continued to press on with a case he most likely would lose, he answered,"Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is not a reason for us not to try to win."

3) A real hero does the job no one else wants to do.

Atticus is assigned to be Tom Robinson's public defender by a judge. He earns the townspeople's anger in his determination to really defend the accused, honorably and fairly, to the best of his abilities. He does the job that other people are unwilling or afraid to do. After facing the town's taunts and threats for his defense of Tom Robinson, Atticus is once more elected to the state legislature--unanimously.

4) A real hero lives with cool dignity. . .

After the trial the real villain, who was father of the girl, threatened Atticus's life, grossly insulted him, and spat in his face. Atticus simply took out a handkerchief and wiped his face prompting the attacker to ask: "Too proud to fight, you nigger-loving bastard?"

"No, too old," Atticus replied before putting his hands in his pocket and walking away.

At one point in the story, Jem and Scout feel disappointed in their father who at 50 doesn't seem to know how to do anything "cool." But they change their minds when Atticus takes down a rabid dog with a single bullet and they learn their father is known as the "deadest shot in Maycomb County."


I crafted my romantic suspense hero in Summer of Deception, Luke Barrett, after this type of hero. Luke fought in the Middle East and lost an eye. He is a widower, his wife was killed in an auto accident and he battles bitterness. He has a young daughter he is trying to rear while managing his Charleston Tea Plantation. In the course of the story he demonstrates his integrity and his physical, moral, and intellectual courage in various cool ways before he finds a happy ending with the summer nanny heroine, Rachel.

Thanks for stopping by. Do you have a characteristic of your fave hero to add to our list? I would love to hear it and may include it in Part 2 of this series on Constructing a Hero. I'll be taking a look at another favorite fictional hero. Please share this blog by clicking on the icons below.

Blessings,
Elva 


Elva Cobb Martin is vice-president of the South Carolina Chapter of American Christian Fiction Writers. She is a former school teacher and a graduate of Anderson University and Erskine College. She has two inspirational novels published with Lighthouse Publishers of the Carolinas. Summer of Deception, a contemporary romantic suspense, and an historical romance, In a Pirate’s Debt. Both have spent time on Amazon’s 100 Best Sellers List for Women’s Religious Fiction. Decision, Charisma, and Home Life have carried Elva's articles. Jim Hart of Hartline Literary represents her. She and her husband Dwayne are semi-retired ministers. A mother and grandmother, Elva lives in South Carolina. Connect with her on her web site http://www.elvamartin.com,on Twitter www.twitter.com/ElvaCobbMartin; Facebook http://www.facebook.com/elvacobbmartin;  and Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/elvacobbmartin
        Link to her romance novels and non-fiction works on Amazon:http://amzn.to/2pOgVHI









Friday, April 6, 2018

First Chapter Pointers - Part 3: Summer of Deception First Chapter

by Elva Cobb Martin

As promised, here is the first chapter of Summer of Deception,
my contemporary romantic suspense novel. Can you see the pointers illustrated for first chapters we've already shared in Parts 1 and 2? Click here for Part 2 http://bit.ly/2GG5ygy

Here are the pointers we covered in Parts 1-2:
1) Introduce the Protagonist
2) Ground the reader in a setting
3) Introduce main plot
4) Introduce conflict and/or problem
5) End chapter with a bang that will force reader to turn the page.


Amazon link to Summer: http://amzn.to/2f0y2SB




Here's the pitch to introduce the story:
Summer of Deception is the story of a young woman who determines to unearth the truth about her brother's reported death by taking a position at an historic Charleston tea plantation, only to realize the truth may destroy her new found love and could even cost her life.








Chapter One
Charleston, South Carolina

Rachel York gasped when the taxi headlights
pierced the stormy night and illuminated Barrett Hall in all its southern grandeur. Her travel fatigue faded, and she leaned forward, energized, as the cab crunched its way up the tree-lined shell drive to the entrance. At the gate, she exited the auto with her umbrella extended, and the taxi driver placed 
her large bag and tote at her side. Rachel thanked him, 
paid him, and hurried up the front walk, pulling her valise
behind her. The vehicle disappeared down the drive,
and darkness closed in as she made her way up the
front steps.

On the wide porch, she propped her umbrella
beside her suitcase, took a deep breath, and tried to
ignore a shiver of disquiet that traveled up her spine.
She would discover the truth about Ron. This summer job 
in Charleston was her first step.

The rain pounding against the slate roof stopped
as quickly as it began. The moon angled out from
behind a cloud, and Rachel glanced around the
plantation’s wide portico with its six imposing
columns and rocking chairs bathed in shadows. The
brass horse-head knocker adorning the entrance added
to its aura.

She held her wristwatch to the moonlight and 
grimaced. Ten o’clock. She’d arrived five hours late
and with her cell phone dead. How early did the
elderly Mr. Barrett retire? Did he think she would
change her mind about his job offer? No way. It was an
answer to prayer.

Rachel breathed in the moist air. The sweet smell
of gardenias delighted her. Swinging her thick hair
behind her shoulders, she lifted the knocker and let it
go. The sound broke the quietness like a pistol shot.
A sharp bark from behind startled Rachel’s
already antsy nerves. She whirled around. A gray
German shepherd the size of a calf stood on the steps.
She grabbed her umbrella and pointed it at the beast as
if it were a sword.

"Gabriel, what are you growling about?" A tall
man stepped into view from a path beside the house,
shaking rain from his cowboy hat. The moonlight
revealed his strong build and rich tan. He wore an eye
patch and an olive green T-shirt etched with the word
Marines.

When he caught sight of Rachel, he commanded
the dog in a strong low voice, "Come, Gabriel." The
animal obeyed, and he snapped a leash on its collar.
"Sorry if this big mutt frightened you. He’s not
ferocious, but we don’t broadcast it. And the umbrella
wouldn’t suffice for your defense if he wanted to
attack—which he doesn’t." The man chuckled, a
pleasant sound in the shadows.

Was he a farmhand or some kind of security
patrolling the grounds? Rachel breathed easier and
lowered her umbrella. She opened her lips to speak,
but the porch flooded with light and the door opened.
Rachel turned.

A gray-haired woman in a wilted apron stood in 
the partial opening. She glared at Rachel with
narrowed blue eyes that rounded as she spied the
luggage.

"I’m Rachel York. Mr. Barrett’s expecting me.
Sorry I’m so late."

"Mr. Barrett, eh? He didn't tell me he was
’specting nobody, ’specially for overnight." She
frowned and pursed her lips. "And I'm the
housekeeper. What did you say your name was?"

“Rachel York." Not expecting me? And not just for
overnight—but the whole summer.

The woman opened the door wider, and her eyes
fell on the man in the shadows. "Oh, there you are."

Rachel glanced back at the man and dog.
He spoke to the housekeeper. "Mrs. Busby, show
our guest to the game room in about two minutes."

"Yes, sir."

Obviously not a farm employee. Or a guard.

Rachel pulled her luggage into an elegant entrance hall
lit by a grand chandelier. A delightful fragrance wafted
up from roses on a side table. She propped her suitcase
upright and dropped her carry-on beside it. Glancing
around, she tilted her chin and smiled. What a place to
have a job for three months. Even a nanny job. Just who 
was the striking man?

The housekeeper disappeared down the hall, and
Rachel tried to still a flutter in her stomach. How could
her arrival be a surprise to the help? 

The woman soon returned and gestured for Rachel to 
follow. They turned past a curving staircase and down 
two steps into an enclosed patio dotted with plants and 
white wicker furniture. Rachel’s metal-capped heels clicked
across polished brick. The house appeared to be exactly the kind of historic residence she expected a southern plantation
owner like elderly Charles Barrett to own. That day in
the college office, Dean Woods described it perfectly as
a Gone with the Wind setting. Her future employer
laughed and nodded at them both.

The woman gave a brief knock at a door and
opened it. She motioned for Rachel to enter and came
in beside her.

Rachel inhaled the delightful woodsy scent of
cedar chips and turned at the sound of the masculine
voice she recognized from the porch.

"Hello, again." The man and the dog stood in front
of an unlit fireplace at the far side of the room. He
wore a towel around his neck and Levis tucked into
army boots. The German shepherd wagged its tail and
started to move forward. But its master spoke a
command. "Sit, Gabriel."

The dog obeyed.

Rachel found it difficult to breathe as the man
glanced from her hair to the stilettos peeking beneath
her jeans. She resisted the urge to smooth her curls or
straighten the blazer.

He cast aside the towel and strode toward Rachel
and the housekeeper. His boots clunked on the
hardwood floor.

Mrs. Busby spoke with a stiff voice. "Mr. Barrett,
shall I place her luggage in your room, sir? Or a guest
room?"

Blood rushed to Rachel’s face. In his room? "No—
this is not the person I’m here to see."
  The housekeeper turned to her. "You said Mr.
Barrett expected you, Miss York."

"I would like to speak with Mr. Charles Barrett, if
you please. He should be expecting me."


The housekeeper’s mouth fell open, but the man
waved her out the door. She left without a word.

He turned to Rachel, a corner of his mouth
quirked up. "You mean my uncle invited you here to
spend the night? That’d be a first."

Speechless, Rachel stared at him, her cheeks hot
enough to fry an egg. Raindrops glistened on his short
black hair, and brown stubble darkened his chiseled
face. The hint of a mustache floated above thin lips
now stretched into a grin. Surely she was the victim of
a joke—and by a most handsome man, even with the
patch across his left eye.

He propped on the edge of the desk, folded his
powerful arms, and met her burning glance. "Sorry,
let’s start over. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen an
honest-to-goodness flush like the one lighting your
face."

Some apology.

"I’m Luke Barrett." A smile showed even white
teeth, and he leaned forward and extended his hand.
The low, rich timbre of his voice vibrated through
Rachel, and the scent of spicy aftershave tickled her
nose. She took a needed breath and shook hands.
Luke's calloused palm swallowed hers, and their gazes
met. A tiny shock coursed through her.

"Rachel York,‛ she said, surprised at the tightness
in her throat. She tried not to stare at the patch and 
disengaged from his handshake.

He reached up and adjusted the black oval.
"Won’t you sit down and tell me why you’re here?"

She moved to a chair and perched on its edge.
Luke sat behind the desk. A small, half-finished
woodcarving lay in front of him. He swept the 
shavings into a trash basket and dropped the wooden
piece and pocketknife into a drawer. Leaning back in
his chair, he cracked his knuckles twice and gazed at
her.

Rachel started to speak, but a grandfather clock
nearby struck the hour, making speech impossible.

Luke cocked his head until the chimes stopped.

"I’m sorry I’m late," Rachel said when silence
again reigned, "but my plane was delayed by the
storm, and I couldn’t get a phone connection. Has your
uncle retired already?"

Something like shutters closed over Luke’s face.
And he sat up straight, alert, similar to a tiger ready to
pounce. "You might say so. You claim he was
expecting you?"

Rachel’s empty stomach knotted. What was going
on? First, the housekeeper, now this nephew. Not the
welcome she hoped for. She shook off her uneasiness—
everything could be cleared up in two seconds. "Mr.
Barrett offered me a summer position caring for a
child. Would you like to see the note?"

Luke’s brow rose, and he reached a wide palm
across the desktop. "Definitely."

Rachel opened her handbag. As she searched for
the paper, his rapt attention reminded her of her
stepfather Lester’s interrogations. A lipstick plopped
out onto the floor, and she bent to retrieve it. Finally,
she found the missive and passed it to Luke.

He unfolded it and read it.

Relax. Never again would she fear Lester Black
and his stifling control. When he discovered she’d left
for a summer job states away, he might become
furious, but he could do nothing about it. She was in
the midst of a new beginning, like her brother Ron 
surely enjoyed in his earlier move to Charleston. A
pain crossed her heart. But she couldn’t think about
Ron. Not yet.

She studied the man before her. Thank God there
was nothing else about him remindful of her
stepfather. A calm strength emanated from Luke
Barrett evocative of Ron and his Drug Enforcement
Administration associates, who kept in top physical
condition.

Luke glanced up at her.

She squirmed and blinked. He’d caught her
staring at him.

An uneasy silence settled in the air as he
reexamined the note. A frown creased his brow.
Rachel’s travel weariness returned, and a dull pain
began to throb behind her eye. She inspected the room
to avoid gazing at him. A padlocked gun case on the
left displayed an assortment of rifles, pistols, and
revolvers. She scanned titles in the bookcase behind
Luke. Her jumbled mind made out "Marines" etched
on a manual. A Bible sat in a corner with some framed
pictures. Two of them featured a dark-headed little
girl. Her charge, perhaps? Some of Rachel’s tension
evaporated.

She stole a glance again at Luke still bent over the
letter. A muscle worked in his jaw. Obviously, he did
not know about his uncle’s job offer to her. Mr.
Barrett’s gentle face the day she talked with him in
Dean Wood’s office floated across her mind, and her
confidence recharged.

Luke dropped the letter on the desk and sat
forward. "Where did you get this, Miss York?" His
challenging demeanor startled her.

She stood and swallowed. "From your uncle, of course. 
He can explain everything.

"Uncle Charles died two weeks ago."

                                ***

 Here is a picture I used for inspiration for my hero as I wrote Summer of Deception. 



         Luke Barrett, before he lost an eye in the war.

By the way, my second novel, In a Pirate's Debt, is actually a prequel to Summer. I went back to Luke's ancestor, the first owner of Barrett Hall, a former pirate, who took the kings' pardon.


Thanks for stopping by. How did you like this first chapter? Did I miss any of the listed pointers that should be in a first chapter? If this series on first chapters has helped you, please share on your social media by clicking on the small icons below.

Blessings,
Elva

Elva Cobb Martin is vice-president of the South Carolina Chapter of American Christian Fiction Writers. She is a former school teacher and a graduate of Anderson University and Erskine College. She has two inspirational novels published with Lighthouse Publishers of the Carolinas. Summer of Deception, a contemporary romantic suspense, and an historical romance, In a Pirate’s Debt. Both have spent time on Amazon’s 100 Best Sellers List for Women’s Religious Fiction. Decision, Charisma, and Home Life have carried Elva's articles. Jim Hart of Hartline Literary represents her. She and her husband Dwayne are semi-retired ministers. A mother and grandmother, Elva lives in South Carolina. Connect with her on her web site http://www.elvamartin.com,on Twitter www.twitter.com/ElvaCobbMartin; Facebook http://www.facebook.com/elvacobbmartin;  and Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/elvacobbmartin
        Link to her romance novels and non-fiction works on Amazon:http://amzn.to/2pOgVHI





Friday, March 30, 2018

When Spring First Came

Remembering Resurrection!   by Elva Cobb Martin

Allston Family Cemetery, Brookgreen Gardens, Myrtle Beach  SC

There is no shouting in the grave. The raging oceans and the world's clamor are silenced. Spring never comes. Seeds do not sprout. No fruit is harvested.

Except for one grave, dug before that first Spring in stony ground for a bruised and broken Seed.

The three women who came to that grave that morning knew about death and preparation of the body. They knew nothing about Spring (not that Spring).

They brought embalming spices, and their main concern was how to move the heavy stone from the the door. Perhaps they wept as they walked along, if they had any tears left.

Perhaps relief had settled on their hearts. Relief that the agony of the Crucifixion was over. Relief that the Sabbath was over, and they could anoint the body of their Friend. Relief--even peace--from the knowledge that they had served their friend in life as they now intended to do in death. They had not saved their flowers for the grave, as some do.

But there was no joy in their hearts. In that day before Spring, only an enemy or a fool would have felt joy at a grave.

"For God so loved the world, He gave his only son." John 3:16
So they came, with their dearly purchased spices, prepared to do all they knew how for the dead. To slow the rot and curb the odor with the embalming spices.

Last at the cross, now first at the tomb, the three women, with their womanly thoughts, concerns, and fears, trudged along that garden path oblivious that Spring had come and that the first fruit of that stony ground was within their touch.

"I am the way the truth and the life. No man comes to the Father, but by me."John 14:6













 





Mary Magdalene, the Bible tells us, was the first to know. Her joyful shout, "Rabboni!" shattered the silent, dark shroud that had lain over mankind through the ages.

The jars of embalming spices fell to the ground as useless as the structures man had built to reach God since the beginning of time. God had reached down to man! Spring had come at last!

After 2,000 years it is still news. It is still news because men still build useless structures, try embalming spices, or climb into trees, as Zaccheus did, to see God.

And most amazing of all, God is still passing by!

                                                           ***

Note: The above is the very first article I sold to a magazine some years ago.
Whoever dreamed a novice writer could make an Easter issue? Just goes to show, you and the Lord can accomplish great things! So keep writing.

What does Easter mean to you? Besides the wonderful spiritual meaning, I love the beautiful season of spring. Below are some photos that inspire Spring in my heart. Hope they do the same for you.

Be blessed,
Elva Cobb Martin


Cherry Blossoms


Brookgreen Gardens Old Gate , Myrtle Beach, SC

Savannah, Georgia, azalea garden square




Brittany, France coast


New Orleans garden



Georgetown, SC 

Friday, March 23, 2018

First Chapter Pointers - Part 2

by Elva Cobb Martin




We shared in Part 1 that my great friend and award-winning author MaryLu Tyndall is collaborating on a book about novel writing. She is collecting samples for How to Write First Chapters.  She gave me six pointers and her examples for info we need to include in first chapters and asked me to share examples from the first chapters of my novels, In a Pirate's Debt and Summer of Deception. 




We covered the first three in Part 1 and you can find them in my post last week. Click here for Part 1 http://bit.ly/2GFyEfV 

To review briefly, they are:

1) A sentence describing the protagonist in the first chapter.
2) A sentence or paragraph describing the setting in your first              chapter.
3) A sentence or paragraph describing the situation in your first            chapter.

4) A sentence describing your character's goal, as revealed in Chapter 1. MaryLu Tyndall's example: Given no other choice, the heroine pirates the seas for enough money to keep her sisters from unwanted marriages. 
The Red Siren, MaryLu Tyndall




Travay Allston determines to make it to Charles Town to an aunt and escape the pursuit of a powerful suitor who has won her hand gambling with her stepfather.
  - In a Pirate’s Debt by Elva Cobb Martin



Rachel York takes a summer nanny position at a Charleston, South Carolina, tea plantation in hopes of getting in touch with her reportedly deceased brother's last Charleston DEA partner.
   - Summer of Deception by Elva Cobb Martin



5) A sentence describing your character's problem or roadblock as revealed in Chapter 1. MLT's example: Heroine is being sold as a white slave on the Island of St. Kitts.  The Blue Enchantress, MaryLu Tyndall


Travay on horseback takes the wrong turn toward the Caribbean instead of to Kingston, and her determined suitor in hot pursuit corners her on a cliff at the ocean’s edge.
    -In a Pirate’s Debt by Elva Cobb Martin



Rachel York arrives at Barrett Hall for a summer nanny position but no one seems to know about her job offer.
  -Summer of Deception by Elva Cobb Martin






6) A sentence describing how you ended the chapter with a bang. : MLT's example:  Heroine is kidnapped by a pirate and tossed into a cabin only to discover he intends to sell her to a Spanish Don in Columbia  
The Raven Saint, MaryLu Tyndall

After forcing her horse over a cliff into the Caribbean to escape a forced marriage, Travay is rescued but discovers her savior is a pirate—a murdering, thieving pirate.
  -In a Pirate’s Debt by Elva Cobb Martin

Rachel York meets the distrustful, handsome new owner of Barrett Hall and is told the uncle she says offered her the nanny position died two weeks earlier.
    - Summer of Deception by Elva Cobb Martin

Are these pointers helping you nail down the information you need to plot your first chapter? Don't miss Part 3 when I plan to share a first chapter to illustrate the six points!

Blessings,
Elva

Elva Cobb Martin is vice-president of the South Carolina Chapter of American Christian Fiction Writers. She is a former school teacher and a graduate of Anderson University and Erskine College. She has two inspirational novels published with Lighthouse Publishers of the Carolinas. Summer of Deception, a contemporary romantic suspense, and an historical romance, In a Pirate’s Debt. Both have spent time on Amazon’s 100 Best Sellers List for Women’s Religious Fiction. Decision, Charisma, and Home Life have carried Elva's articles. Jim Hart of Hartline Literary represents her. She and her husband Dwayne are semi-retired ministers. A mother and grandmother, Elva lives in South Carolina. Connect with her on her web site http://www.elvamartin.com,on Twitter www.twitter.com/ElvaCobbMartin; Facebook http://www.facebook.com/elvacobbmartin;  and Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/elvacobbmartin
        Link to her romance novels and non-fiction works on Amazon:http://amzn.to/2pOgVHI